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About

FarrellWolst is a family owned Builders and Landscaping company. Comprising of two brothers and one uncle, deep routed family ties underpin the values of the business.

With over 30 years, combined, construction and landscaping experience, spanning numerous sectors and undertakings;

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Reviews (13)

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G
13 August 2020

Liam installed the 40mm Amalfi grass and we couldn't be happier with it. We even had enough left over to do the front garden! Great service and a professional finish. Would highly recommend. More...

L
3 July 2020

We had a Garage Conversion carried out by Paul and Ryan. Liam came to see us within a day of requesting a quote, and was very helpful. Recommend

L
3 July 2020

Liam and Steve did an incredible job with our Artifical grass installation.
It was a 30mm Madrid grass installed over 2 days. With the old turf removed and a brand new base fitted. More...

L
26 April 2020

FarrellWolst were superb. I received a quote within about 45 minutes of sending some photographs. We went with a 40mm Cape Verde Artificial grass, because of its quality and it has a 9 year warranty. Delighted with the outcome.
Thank you
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M
26 April 2020

Liam and Kieron did a tremendous job on my back garden. We had a new artificial turf lay, along with decking and some reclaimed sleepers to the side for a new flower bedding area. Would highly recommend.

L
5 April 2020

Thank you for all of the work completed on the extension. We love it and would highly recommend you to family and friends.

P
4 April 2020

Excellent service from Liam. Always on hand to answer any question and very knowledgeable. Does exactly the job promised with no messing about. 5* rating from me!

M
4 April 2020

Decided to go with FarrellWolst to complete my loft conversion as it was the best quote and it was clear that they were experienced and new what they talking about. Very glad I did. Excellent work, quick, tidy, and a quality finish.very pleased. Will be using them again in the future no doubt. More...

K
4 April 2020

I had a single extension, kitchen diner completed by FarrellWolst. I love it! The guys were brilliant, professional, friendly and got the job done. Nothing was too much trouble for them. Definitely recommend. More...

C
3 April 2020

Paul and Liam completed a Forms Conversion on my Bungalow in 2019. I had such a great experience, they were always open and honest and delivered us a terrific double bedroom.

B
3 April 2020

5 star job damp proofing out basement last year. Thanks paul

J
3 April 2020

I would recommend Liam and his team. He worked on our garage conversion for 2 weeks and created a fantastic office for myself and my partner Janet. 5 Star service.

B
3 April 2020

Had a loft conversion done last year, everything was straight forward I couldn't be happier. The work was exceptional and the job was completed to the highest possible standard, it was also left immaculate everyday. The lads we're extremely polite and always turned up on time. Great team. More...

Q&A

Garage Foundations
Typically if the existing foundations are above 200mm or over this is adequate to extend straight up with new brickwork.

The importance of foundations cannot be overstated after all, everything rest on them. A new roof, windows, doors and double skinned walls will all be part of the new construction, as such an infill wall will be required.

To determine the existing garage footings, this may involve digging a small trial hole in front of the concrete slab (the foundations below the garage) to check.
In the absence of adequate foundations, either a 1m footing wall will have to be dig and filled with concrete, or something like a concrete lintel can be added into the wall, below ground level, on both sides.

https://farrellwolst.co.uk/garage-conversions/

Converting a garage to a living space has more than just a benefit to the family by way of an additional befroom, or kitchen diner, etc.

A conversion, carried out well, can add up to 20% to the value of the home, according to a home’s report from Nationwide.
The following should hopefully answer some Initial questions and paint a clearer picture of what a conversion entails.

Planning Permission
Typically planning permission is not required with integral garage conversions, as it tends to fall under permitted development. Needless to say, it is vital to check with the local authority.

However, if the house is in a conservation area, or is a listed building, you will most likely need planning permission. It is wise to also check for any planning conditions attached to the house or garage when constructed (I.E. the garage has to remain as parking.)

If the conversion falls under permitted development, we advise to apply for a Lawful Development Certificate (LDC), especially if the aim is to remortgage or sell in the future.
If the garage is a stand-alone structure, not integral, then an application for a change of use is probably necessary.
Factors affecting Cost
There are a number of factors that could affect the cost of a garage conversion;

Requirements and service of a structural engineer.
Planning Application.
Foundations need reinforcing.
Design Fees
Ceiling height needs to be raised.
Condition of the existing walls, floor & roof.
The cost of a garage conversion is usually less than the value it will ultimately add to the property itself, following completion.

Building Regulations Approval
Building regulations have to be adhered to when converting a garage into a habitable space. The regulations apply to a number of different aspects of the construction, including;

Thermal performance
Acoustics
Fire Safety
Ventilation
The LABC website (https://www.labc.co.uk/) hosts a variety of information regarding the regulations in England and Wales.

A building notice or full plans application is required to be submitted to building control. The local building control department will then register the conversion & carry out inspections throughout the works, finally issuing the ‘Final Certificate’ on completion.

Garage Foundations
Typically if the existing foundations are above 200mm or over this is adequate to extend straight up with new brickwork.

The importance of foundations cannot be overstated after all, everything rest on them. A new roof, windows, doors and double skinned walls will all be part of the new construction, as such an infill wall will be required.

To determine the existing garage footings, this may involve digging a small trial hole in front of the concrete slab (the foundations below the garage) to check.
In the absence of adequate foundations, either a 1m footing wall will have to be dig and filled with concrete, or something like a concrete lintel can be added into the wall, below ground level, on both sides.

Insulation
There are to methods of Insulating Walls;

The simplest method is to use insulated plasterboard, fixed to the timber battens that are protected by a strip of damp proof course (DPF) placed between batten and wall.
Insulation such as rockwool can be placed between battens before plasterboard is fixed to them, or insulate within the cavity.
In regards to Roof Insulation, It all depends on the type of roof;
Pitched roof; we like to opt for two layers of 150mm glass fiber quilt between the joists & another over as usual.
Flat roofs with the standard 150mm deep flat roof joists will require a 100m insulation between the joists & a 50mm break, complying with the requirements of a 50mm air gap left above for ventilation.

Floor Insulation In a garage is usually none existent. Garage floors also tend be lower than the actual house floor, so adding damp proof membrane (DPM), insulation and a new screed, along with the final floor covering is a good way the level up, to match the rest of the house.

The existing concrete floor of the garage can still remain as the base, adding a solid DPM, before fitting a layer of insulation on top, Building control will advise on the required level of insulation that’s needed. The new screed is then poured ready to then lay the new floor covering.

We like to install underfloor heating at this stage. When the difference in height is very large between the garage floor and the house floor a suspended timber floor is a good idea, aiming to create a 150mm void beneath the concrete and the underside of the timber, placing the insulation between the joists.

Plumbing & Electrical
With the introduction of a new living space the new garage conversion is going to add additional demand on the power and plumbing supplies.

Typically a new circuit for lights and sockets is all that’s required, as such, taking this supply from the existing electrical feed (household consumer unit) should be sufficient. We do like to protect a large garage conversion with its own consumer unit, with the feed coming directly from the mains supply. This ensures additional security, in the sense that the garage conversion consumer unit has a completely isolated electrical supply to any other part of the house.

There may be some additional work required if the extra plumbing system is at full capacity, the same applies if the main outflows for water and the soil outflow are some distance away from the garage.

Can all Lofts/Attics be converted?
Evaluating your space’s appropriateness for transformation includes thinking about various variables, including:

Available head height
Rooftop pitch
Rooftop structure
Impediments, for example, water tanks or chimney stacks
On the off chance that the roofspace review uncovers a head stature of under 2.2m, there are two options that are available to provide the adequate headroom.

Arrangement 1: Raise the Roof

This is basically attainable, however the serious issues are the significant expense and getting arranging consent endorsement. In the event that the entire rooftop territory needs removing, a covered scaffold structure, to shield the house from the weather during the works, would likewise be required.

Arrangement 2: Lower the Ceiling in the Room Below

This will require all the existing roofs of the floor below the loft to be removed, meaning a slightly bigger project.

You will likewise need to evaluate whether the space you are picking up in the loft compensates for the space you are losing in the rooms beneath.

Adding a Staircase to a Loft Conversion
The perfect area for a staircase to land is in accordance with the roof ridge: this will best utilize the available height above the staircase.

The Pitch line minimum height requirement is 2m, although a reduction of this can take place; 1.9m if in the centre, and 1.8m to the side of a stair.

Practically speaking, the staircase position will rely on the format of the floor underneath, and where necessary the required height can be accomplished by utilizing a dormer or adding a rooflight over the staircase or, if suitable, changing over a hip roof end to a gable.

Do I Need to Replace the Ceiling Joists When Converting a Loft?
By and large, additional new joists will be required to agree to the Building Regulations as existing ceiling joists are probably not going to have the capability to take a conversion floor.

The structural engineer will determine the size and grade required.

The new joists span between load-bearing walls, and are typically raised marginally over the current ceiling plasterwork by utilizing spacers underneath the joist ends. This spacing must be adequate to avoid any new floor joist deflection from contacting the ceiling plaster beneath.

The new joists run alongside the current joists. Above window and door openings, thicker timbers are utilized to bridge the opening, with the goal that weight isn’t put on the current opening lintel.

Rolled steel joists (known as RSJs) are also specified to distribute the load, and in certain installations are utilized to carry the ends of the new joists. Where head height is limited, thicker joists, more closely spaced, can be specified.

https://farrellwolst.co.uk/loft-conversions/

Farrellwolst Loft Conversion guide
We understand a Loft Conversion to your property can feel daunting and a substantial undertaking, however, when you have experts in the field, with vast experience, these feelings should soon be replaced with excitement! The below is an overview of the options available, along with some items to thing about, when it comes converting your loft space. We hope you find it useful in answering some of your questions

Most Attic / loft space transformations will in general fall under Permitted Development, yet you will require arranging consent on the off chance that you live in a listed building or a designated area. You will always need to stick to the Building Regulations.

You will likewise need to consider your current rooftop structure and the requirement for another staircase, just as how you will light, warm and ventilate the new room(s).

Building Regulations and Implications
When converting your attic/loft, you will require Building Regulations endorsement. A structure control surveyor will review your change at different stages and will be liable for giving a finish declaration upon definite assessment.

In the event that your house is a semidetached or terraced, at that point you should tell your neighbors of your arranged work on the off chance that it falls under the necessities of the Party Wall Act.

With regards to the works carried out, the main areas in regards to Building regulations to be aware of are Parts L, K, B and P of the Building Regulations.

Part L of the Building Regulations requires U-value targets for thermal efficiency to be met when you convert your space into livable space.

Part K concerns protection measures from falling, crashes and sway, and requires a minimum headroom of 2m for all getaway routes, including the stairs (the rules are a little relaxed, for staircases providing the route of entry to a loft conversion.)

Parts B and P are concerned about fire and electrical wellbeing respectively. Agreeing to Building Regs’ prerequisites ablaze security can be perplexing. In at least two story homes, where an escape window would be more than 4.5m from the ground level, a ‘secured’ staircase needs to lead down to an outside entryway — which can cause a few issues if your staircase ascends from a room, as opposed to the hallway on the ground floor, or your ground floor is open plan. There are ordinarily arrangements in the two cases, yet this region needs thought with your plans.

Can all Lofts/Attics be converted?
Evaluating your space’s appropriateness for transformation includes thinking about various variables, including:

Available head height
Rooftop pitch
Rooftop structure
Impediments, for example, water tanks or chimney stacks
On the off chance that the roofspace review uncovers a head stature of under 2.2m, there are two options that are available to provide the adequate headroom.

Arrangement 1: Raise the Roof

This is basically attainable, however the serious issues are the significant expense and getting arranging consent endorsement. In the event that the entire rooftop territory needs removing, a covered scaffold structure, to shield the house from the weather during the works, would likewise be required.

Arrangement 2: Lower the Ceiling in the Room Below

This will require all the existing roofs of the floor below the loft to be removed, meaning a slightly bigger project.

You will likewise need to evaluate whether the space you are picking up in the loft compensates for the space you are losing in the rooms beneath.

Adding a Staircase to a Loft Conversion
The perfect area for a staircase to land is in accordance with the roof ridge: this will best utilize the available height above the staircase.

The Pitch line minimum height requirement is 2m, although a reduction of this can take place; 1.9m if in the centre, and 1.8m to the side of a stair.

Practically speaking, the staircase position will rely on the format of the floor underneath, and where necessary the required height can be accomplished by utilizing a dormer or adding a rooflight over the staircase or, if suitable, changing over a hip roof end to a gable.

Do I Need to Replace the Ceiling Joists When Converting a Loft?
By and large, additional new joists will be required to agree to the Building Regulations as existing ceiling joists are probably not going to have the capability to take a conversion floor.

The structural engineer will determine the size and grade required.

The new joists span between load-bearing walls, and are typically raised marginally over the current ceiling plasterwork by utilizing spacers underneath the joist ends. This spacing must be adequate to avoid any new floor joist deflection from contacting the ceiling plaster beneath.

The new joists run alongside the current joists. Above window and door openings, thicker timbers are utilized to bridge the opening, with the goal that weight isn’t put on the current opening lintel.

Rolled steel joists (known as RSJs) are also specified to distribute the load, and in certain installations are utilized to carry the ends of the new joists. Where head height is limited, thicker joists, more closely spaced, can be specified.

Bringing Natural Light into a Loft Conversion
You have two options with regards to guiding natural light into your conversion — rooflights or dormers.

Rooflights
The most convenient and simple strategy is to utilize rooflights that follow the pitch line of the roof. This sort is fitted by removing the tiles and battens where the rooflight will be fitted. The rafters are cut to clear a path for the rooflight after appropriately strengthening the rest of the rafters.

The rooflight frame is then fitted and flashings included before making good the surrounding tiling.

This kind of window is the most economic, and more likely to be allowed without planning permission.

Dormer Windows
Dormers give natural light but can also add space to a loft conversion. They are especially effective where the pitch angle is high, as the useful floor area can be increased.

The mansard sort will give give maximum conversion roof space, since it projects the maximum available head height, in turn giving a greater usable floor area. A hip to gable conversion has a similar effect.

Dormers and other comparable conversions are typically installed by opening up the roof, and cutting the necessary specified timbers to size on site.

Adding a Bathroom in a Loft Conversion
In the event that you are adding a bathroom you’ll have to consider the area of existing services. Adding hot and cold water supplies is simple, simply branch off the existing plumbing system, either at the boiler or from the floor below. Adaptable plastic plumbing is anything but difficult to string through the joists.

Existing soil pipes are probably going to be vented above roof level and it might be possible to add a connection into this, or into another soil pipe on the floor beneath. Where there is no current soil stack you might have the option to add one; in any case, a smallbore adaptable waste pipe can be utilized to connect to the drains.

We have been trading for 9 years.
We have just incorporated as a limited company after being a partnership for nearly a decade.

Our basement conversions come with a 30 year Guarantee on all parts and materials.

Our Loft Conversions come with a 12 month guarantee on all materials and labour
Our Garage Conversions come with a 12 month guarantee on all materials and labour
Our Extensions come with a 12 month guarantee on all materials and labour


The site surveys and being creative with the client. It's incredible what thinking out of the box can achieve.
From a different pitch in an extension roof solving an aesthetic problem the customer believed they had - to state of the art 5mm underfloor heating installations to keep the cost down.

I am a fully qualified electrician, and started off self employed due to a lack of jobs available when i became qualified, this lead me to secure bigger electrical contracts, in turn through discussions with my uncle (Joiner) and Brother (Bricklayer) I decided to set up in construction and piece all of our skills and talents together.

We have 5 star reviews from every customer. We are not leaving a job until everybody is happy; plain and simple.

https://www.yell.com/biz/farrellwolst-leigh-9945044/ - 5 Star Reviews

Bark - 5 Star Reviews

Google Business Page - 5 Star Reviews

We offer free quotations and guidance. Our master joiner Paul has been in the construction field for over 30 years, there really isn't anything he hasn't seen and worked on.
Please get in touch and we would be delighted to assist.

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https://farrellwolst.co.uk/loft-conversions/

https://farrellwolst.co.uk/landscaping/

https://farrellwolst.co.uk/garage-conversions/

https://farrellwolst.co.uk/extensions/

https://farrellwolst.co.uk/basements/