Lynwoods Building Consultancy  logo

Lynwoods Building Consultancy

Lynwoods Building Consultancy  locationLiverpool & St. Helens, Merseyside

We are a dedicated property and building surveying consultancy based in Merseyside providing core surveying services to businesses, to homeowners and to property developers and investors.

If you’re moving business premises, moving home, concerned about a building defect; or planning a refurbishment, extension or conversion project then we are ready to assist you.

In partnership with our sister company, Neptune Aerial Works, we deploy the latest remotely-piloted aircraft technology to inspect the roofs and high level fabric of commercial and industrial property to ensure that our building surveys, maintenance inspections and condition surveys are amongst the most comprehensive available. We are at the forefront of bringing this technology into the building surveying industry.

The practice is led by Chris Cousineau: a Chartered Building Surveyor and CAA-approved drone operator with over 15 years experience in property and construction services working with many domestic clients, commercial property landlords and tenants, rail operating companies and pension funds.

  • 1 hours average response time
Lynwoods Building Consultancy  Reviews

Bark Reviews


No reviews yet.

Lynwoods Building Consultancy


Click to rate:

Lynwoods Building Consultancy  on Google Maps

Company Location

Rivington Works, Rivington Ave, Saint Helens WA10 6UU, UK

Lynwoods Building Consultancy  Q&A

Company Q&A

How can someone tell if their Garage is suitable for conversion?

This depends upon the nature of the proposed conversion and the construction form of the garage. Garage conversions require the external walls, floor and roof to be thermally upgraded, and sometimes thickened and strengthened, in order to meet current building codes and to perform adequately in their new use as habitable spaces. This is usually not a major problem with most brick-built garages, however, prefabricated garages - such as those made from concrete panels - or those made from asbestos sheets cannot be converted in the same way. If you're unsure then we offer free consultations to determine the suitability of your garage for your conversion ideas. Call us and we'll do all the investigation work for you !

Run us through the different stages of the Garage conversion process - what's involved?

The process is generally as follows:
- Initial site visit to determine the suitability of the garage for the intended conversion and to consider any other factors - such as party wall implications etc.
- Form an outline scope of works and consider the budget implications.
- Check the planning and other restrictions, if any, and consider the local authority planning and building control fees.
- Measure up the garage and prepare the existing and proposed plans, including details on improvements to walls, floor and roof etc.
- Submit the plans to the council for planning and building control approvals.
- Resolve any party wall or other neighbour implications.
- Obtain builders quotes based upon the final building control drawings and choose the preferred builder - considering things like cost, experience, attention to building codes, availability etc.
- Once planning and building control approvals and party wall agreements are in hand, away you go !

How can someone tell if their loft is suitable for conversion?

This again depends upon the nature of the proposed conversion and whether additional space and/or headroom needs to be created. If you live in a home that was constructed before the 1950's then chances are the roof is a 'traditional' roof that has been pieced together using individual rafters and purlins. These types of roof generally lend themselves to loft conversions.
If your home was built from the mid-1950's onward then chances are it will have been constructed with a prefabricated truss timber roof. These trusses are obvious by their distinctive metal plates holding the roof timbers together. Because these trusses are prefabricated, they are engineered to act as structural cassettes and cannot be easily altered. These lofts are generally not suitable for conversion without major work - including stripping the roof back and replacing the trusses with ones designed for a 'room in the roof'. This is quite possible, though obviously more expensive and disruptive.
If your loft is suitable for conversion then a number of other factors have to be carefully considered - including upgrading the floor joists, the fire regulations and means of escape from the new loft room, whether there are solid load-bearing walls beneath the loft to carry the upgraded joists - or whether some steelwork is required; if steelwork is required and it bears on to the party wall(s) then party wall agreements with the neighbours will need to be in place etc. There is a lot more to a proper loft conversion than simply putting chipboard over the existing joists. We can check the details and put together the most appropriate solution.

Run us through the different stages in the loft conversion process - what’s involved?

The process is generally as follows:
- Initial site visit to determine the suitability of the loft for the intended conversion and to consider any other factors - such as party wall implications etc.
- Form an outline scope of works and consider the budget implications.
- Check the planning and other restrictions, if any, and consider the local authority planning and building control fees.
- Measure up the loft and other floors and prepare the existing and proposed plans, including details on upgrades to walls, floor and roof etc.
- Obtain structural engineer's calculations for the upgraded floor and steelwork, if necessary.
- Submit the plans to the council for planning and building control approvals.
- Resolve any party wall or other neighbour implications.
- Obtain builders quotes based upon the final building control drawings and choose the preferred builder - considering things like cost, experience, attention to building codes, availability etc.
- Once planning and building control approvals and party wall agreements are in hand, away you go !

Twitter Feed


Are you sure that you want to leave?